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How Jenny Went From Unemployed to $17,000/Month Freelance Copywriting

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Want to know how my student, Jenny – a fun, free-spirited yogi and graduate of Copy Posse Launch Pad Season 2 – went from filing for unemployment to earning 6-figures as a freelance copywriter in just over a year?

Hey Posse! What’s up, it’s Alex!

Coming at ya this week with an exclusive sneak peek at a BONUS INTERVIEW I conducted with one of my awesome Copy Posse Launch Pad Grads, Jenny. 

The full interview is for the students inside my email copywriting program—the Own The Inbox Challenge… 

But the invaluable tidbits and juicy nuggets of wisdom that Jenny shared were just TOO DAMN GOOD, so I decided to release a portion of the interview for all of you! 

Give me a comment up below if you want to see more exclusive student interviews like this one and if you’re new to the crew… welcome!

I put out a new copywriting and marketing video every week, so if you want to learn more about the trends, tactics, and tools that work TODAY, then be sure to subscribe below… 

And don’t forget to subscribe to my newsletter to be notified when my next blog post goes up. 

Now, I am so excited for you to see this interview because it is PROOF that despite the challenges, doubts and fears that inevitably creep up when you make the decision to put yourself out there and try something new…

Success, freedom, and financial independence are absolutely achievable when you set your mind to it and work hard. 

In this interview, you’re going to hear how Jenny, a then yoga instructor had to go on unemployment for the first time in her life after losing her job in 2020 due to the pandemic.

Lost, confused and desperate for work, she found a part-time job working 10 hours a week selling crystals for $17/hour (that’s $680/month)…

And just over a year later, Jenny was earning a life-changing $17,000/month as a freelance copywriter. 

Then $19,000 the month after that…

And $20,000 the month after that… 

In this interview she’s spilling all the tea on exactly how she did it. And her tips for finding clients are seriously amazing. So, ya betta be ready to take some notes. Here’s the interview!

How Jenny Made $17,000/Month Freelance Copywriting

Alex:

So let’s dive in. Take us back, Jenny. Take us back to right before the pandy. The pandy. The pandemic hit.

Jenny:

The thing that we don’t like to name. So to rewind, I was working full-time as a yoga teacher, and running their sales program and teaching 10 to 12 classes a week. And obviously, that happened, we shut down, had to stop teaching classes.

And the day before my birthday, March 8th, I became unemployed. And from March until I think it was mid-July, I was searching for jobs. I was on unemployment. Just myself, my partner doesn’t have a job because he has an autoimmune disease. So we were just on one income.

And I was like, what am I going to do?

Alex:

On unemployment income.

Jenny:

Unemployment income. Living in California, mind you, so things are not cheap. So I started searching for jobs, and I found a job supporting a crystal company, selling crystals.

Alex:

First of all, can I just say you are our resident little hippie Yogi witch, which I absolutely love! Yoga teacher turned crystal slinger healer.

Jenny:

Yup.

Alex:

So I just want to focus on that one thing for a second, because I just got mad chills when you were like, wow, July 2020 you were on unemployment.

Jenny:

Yeah.

Alex:

That’s insane. Okay. It’s insane because I know where you are now, and I’m just like, wow.

Jenny:

I know. It’s hard to believe. So in July 2020, I was on unemployment, and I managed to get a job for $17 US dollars an hour. So I had unemployment going and this job, working 5 to 10 hours a week. And I managed to see a job posting for a company that I really love, a Tarot company. And I had applied to work for their company five times, you guys. Five times denied. Five.

Alex:

Denied.

Jenny:

Denied. On the sixth time, I applied for their copywriter position because I realized that I had the skills, but I didn’t know what copywriting was. So I applied, only 30% qualified for the job, and Googled how to teach yourself copywriting. And lo and behold, found Alex and started teaching myself copywriting, just binge-watching all of her YouTube videos. Landed the job, was learning on the job copywriting. And then…

Alex:

Can I pause you right there? I have a question.

Jenny:

Go ahead.

Alex:

I love that, that you had no idea what copywriting was, but you read the job description and you’re like, “Wait that actually sounds like something I want to do.” Which I think is so common for people who are getting into copywriting, is they don’t know what it is until they find out what it is.

And then they’re like, oh my God, that sounds like me, but can I actually do it? So I’m also curious about the job. Were they asking for an experienced copywriter? How did you land the job when really not that long before that, you didn’t even know what it was?

Jenny:

That’s a good question. I had refreshed their careers page, and that’s kind of the trick that I’m happy to share with you guys of how I land jobs. I was refreshing their careers page, and every time they had a job opening, virtual assistant, I don’t know, whatever it was, I would apply.

And then copywriting came up. Here’s the thing is, I was writing emails for the yoga studio. I was uploading templates in MailChimp, doing all of these things. I didn’t realize that that was a skill. I just thought it was something that I did as a manager.

So when I was reading the job description, I realized that the skill of copywriting is teachable. My personality is who I am. And so being able to use that is what finally, sixth time’s the charm, got the job.

Alex:

And you realized that you had already kind of been doing copywriting, which to be honest, we all do in some capacity. If you’ve ever sent an email asking for something, trying to persuade someone to do something for you, you’re a copywriter. It’s just not maybe knowing it, and really being like, oh, actually this is a skill that I can feed and nourish and keep learning.

And so then you found my channel, and you started learning copyrighting, you applied and you got this job, yay. And persistence, right? Like you said, you applied for everything.

And I often say that to people, yes, I know we’re all like, copywriter, copywriter, copywriter. But so many times you can get your foot in the door with a company by applying for a related position, right? And so you applied for it all.

Jenny:

So then when did we do Write and Ignite? Was that December?

Alex:

That would’ve been the end of November last year. So just basically a year ago.

Jenny:

Yeah. So from the end of July, until November, I was binge-watching your YouTube channels and taking notes and just teaching myself the skill. And then I signed up for the Write and Ignite challenge. And so that was in November.

And then I offered a friend who had just started a business to write her emails for her in exchange for a testimonial, because you guys, I had nothing. Nothing, no testimonial, no website, nothing. And that was my first client. So in exchange for the testimonial, and for the emails that I wrote her during the challenge, because I did the sales page, of course, but also emails. I managed to get my first client.

And I share an office with this person, and I’ve been working for her for a year. And it’s just… Yeah. Honestly, who was it? Christine. Christine put in the comments last night, this seems impossible. And I was talking to my boyfriend about it last night, thinking yeah, it does. It still feels impossible to me, but I’m here. And so I swear to you, if I can do it, you can do it. I swear.

Alex:

I think too, impossible. It’s one of those things where it seems impossible until you’ve done it, and then watching other people do it. And that word impossible, I think it’s imposter syndrome in some ways because it’s really easy for us to go, no, no that’s impossible.

And then we completely remove the reality that it could actually happen. And so not even talking about your copywriting career, watch that word. Because it can show up, and if you are always using that as, “This, oh, it’s impossible, it’s impossible, it’s impossible.” Then of course it’s not going to be possible.

Okay, so you were hired as a copywriter at this company, but you weren’t making substantially more than you were making selling crystals, right?

Jenny:

No. I mean, pretty similar, actually.

Alex:

Right. But you were doing something that felt creative, and you’re like, okay I’m learning. Yeah.

Jenny:

Yeah.

Alex:

So then when was it you were in the… When did you ask your friend or your client, your first client, you’re like, Hey, can I write emails for you for free? When was that?

Jenny:

That was in… I mean, it was around Black Friday. I might have finished the Write and Ignite challenge, and I was super scared to put my skills into action, but I had this job that I had to get really good at because they hired me to do it. And yeah, so then that happened in November.

And then about two months later she budgeted to hire me, and I came on for pennies on the dollar because I just wanted the experience.

Alex:

So you were working for this company, then you signed up for the Launch Pad.

Jenny:

Yeah. So then in December… So let me back up. I was binge-watching your YouTube videos and refreshing your page, waiting for any training. I’m a training junkie. Like Lindsay said, I will sign up for everything. And I knew I wanted to do it.

So finally the Write and Ignite challenge happened. And then I signed up for that, waited with bated breath for something to open. And I’m pretty sure I was the first one. I’ll have to go back and look, I’m pretty sure I was the first one to sign up for the Launchpad, and…

Alex:

I should have checked that!

Jenny:

And then yeah, for the eight weeks or nine weeks, however long it was, I was working two jobs, the tarot company and the crystal company, and then teaching myself copywriting at night.

And you guys, I was not on any of the lives. I would re-watch everything at night, and just try to figure out how to do it, because it was important to me. And I knew this was the direction. Every bone in my body said yes.

Alex:

I love that, because I remember when you, you were not only the first one to join the program but you were first one to finish the program. And I remember when you submitted your final portfolio at the end of the Launchpad, I felt like I didn’t really know you because you weren’t on any of the lives.

I had seen you posting in the group, but you were the first one to complete the program. And that, I think, was so powerful. You obviously just really created the time in the space to sit down and work on it, despite having two jobs at the same time.

Jenny:

Yeah, and I think that’s something that people don’t necessarily see behind the scenes. It was tough. It’s doable, but I worked my ass off, and it paid off.

And it’s just for a short period of time. And then the success comes, and of course you have to continue working hard. But yeah, I guess my advice would be if it feels right and you know that this is something that you want to add to your toolbox, whether you want to be a copywriter or not, the skills that we learned, that I learned, are forever going to make me a better person.

Not even just a better writer, but just a better person.

Alex:

Yeah. I think that’s the thing I love so much about copywriting, and I’ve heard this from some of you posting in the group, you’re like, okay, yes, we’re writing emails, but I’m writing better cover letters.

I’m positioning myself differently in my meetings in front of my bosses. Copywriting in marketing is literally every day. And I think that to me is so fun, how we can use the skillset in so many different ways.

Jenny:

Yeah. And I’m sure we’ll get more into it, but something that just came up for me that I want to share is I got to this point where I was making lots of money for other people. And I had a moment where I was like, “Why the hell can’t I do this? I’m making hundreds of thousands of dollars for other people selling their products and things like that. What about me?”

I’m just going to take a chance on myself and try this freelance thing, and guess what, if it doesn’t work I can go make $17 an hour somewhere down the street and be fine doing a nine to five. And so with that shift in that mentality, just finally betting on myself and saying, what do I have to lose?

Alex:

Why not me? Yeah.

Jenny:

Why not? Yeah.

Alex:

Why the fuck not? Seriously?

Jenny:

Why the fuck not? I literally said fuck it. I wrote down fuck it and just did it.

Alex:

But I have a question too because I feel like this kind of came up on the call yesterday. This idea, especially for people who do consider themselves to be more spiritual, or are more spiritual, and this idea of spirituality and contribution and purpose being in alignment with also fucking having a six figure business.

Did you ever have that disconnect there, or for you, did you always really believe like, no, no, you can have both of these things? Because I mean, I love that you’re so into the woo woo, but then you’re hustling and killing it in your business. And to me that’s amazing.

Jenny:

I might get too “woo” for some of you, just hold on, I promise we’ll bring it back to reality.

Alex:

There’s no such thing as too woo!

Jenny:

In the woo world, the yoga teaching world, there is a belief system that as a yoga teacher, I have to show up and serve for free while the highest person is making money. So that is a belief system that has been ingrained in me.

So it took an unlearning of even sharing with all of you the fact that I had a $17,000 month makes me feel icky inside. Like I have to back it up with like, well wait, but wait, I’m not… I didn’t make that month. And so I’m just to this point where I feel like we all deserve to be wealthy, because what does wealth mean?

Wealth means that I can be of service to you guys, and jump on a call every single day for two weeks because I had a good month last month. It means that I can give my services to a company that’s doing regenerative agriculture, whatever, those types of things.

So I think to answer your question, no, my belief system has been, I am not supposed to make money being of service, and that has been my story. So I’ve always shown up for free or made not a lot of money. And at some point, there was a moment where I said, thus far, no further. Why not? Fuck it, I’m just going to try it.

And I shattered my own belief system and glass ceiling, and I’m only here on this call talking about money, which is super uncomfortable for me because I truly believe that every single person that’s watching this or even here live has the capacity and ability to make what you want to make.

You deserve it. There’s enough abundance out there, and you’ll call it in. I promise.

Alex:

Yeah. Oh, that’s so freaking awesome. It’s awesome because I mean, I think everyone can relate to that in some capacity. I remember being really nervous talking about it. I think I’ve shared this on one of our sessions when I was interviewed by Forbes and had hit seven figures. Which to me, I couldn’t even conceive.

And I was so nervous about that going public because I don’t know what I was afraid of. I was afraid that people would view me differently, or they would think that I only cared about money when my purpose is truly to serve. And I thought, oh my God, people are going to see that as two competing things.

And so I think we all have to lean into that in some capacity. And whether or not that’s the limiting belief or there’s some other one, it’s so powerful to identify it, and then like you said, say fuck it and just lean right into it.

Jenny:

Yeah. And it’s really uncomfortable, whatever stories our parents and ancestors have created around money, there is a culture, not only that women aren’t supposed to make money, but that people that struggle are always going to struggle.

And what this community and this posse has given for me is the opportunity to reframe that and rewrite my story and my power statement, which is, “I am abundant.” And when I’m abundant, I’m in the flow, and I can give more, and that’s important. Service is my “why.”

Alex:

Yeah. And it doesn’t mean you can’t be in service and also have a very successful business. I love that, your power statement. And yeah, there’s just so much goodness there.

So let’s rewind a little bit. You’re in the Launchpad, you had the one client who you did work for free. Which, there’s a lot of debate out there. So many people are like, “No, I would never work for free.” And yeah, obviously there’s an extent to that, similar to what you were saying where you felt like oh, you were always working for free.

No, no, no. If there’s a way to get your foot in the door in the beginning, and do something that feels really good, and you’re in service, and you’re not getting nothing for it. You’re getting something to add to your portfolio or whatever. You have to check-in, obviously with what feels good. But I love that you did that. Because that was really what got the ball rolling for you.

Jenny:

Yeah. And then in the Launchpad, my A-list client ended up hiring me to do a couple of projects. It was emails, actually. And then that was what started it. So I was still working for the tarot company. I quit the $17 an hour job, bumped my pay up a little bit, a couple of dollars, and then just really went into copywriting.

And then I got to a point where I realized my worth, and I needed to pivot. And so I left the secure nine to five job and went fully freelance in let’s see, July 25th of this year. So that’s only five months, that’s it. I’ve only been freelancing for five months.

Alex:

So July 2020 you were on unemployment.

Jenny:

Yeah.

Alex:

Then July 2021, you went full-time into freelance copywriting. That is so epic. And I didn’t even know that your A-list client hired you for a couple of projects. That’s amazing. I love that so much. So you went full-time, I remember that post. You were like, I did it. I quit my job. I’m going full time.

Now take us to today. Basically you had three months in a row up until the point of you and I chatting about this, maybe now it’s four months in a row. But I mean you made $17,000 in a month, and months in a row, but I mean, you made $17,000 in a month, and that wasn’t just one month. You made the same, if not comparable, the next month and the next month after that.

Jenny:

So my human design type, if you guys are familiar, is a generator, so I’m just constantly in battery mode moving forward. So I did the thing you’re not supposed to do as a copywriter or freelancer is I said yes to everything. So I was working seven days a week and got all the way to my burnout and realized, “Oh, this isn’t for me.” And found a sweet spot.

So last month I think my sweet spot was right around that. It’s even hard to say. That 12 to 13 is what I made, and I hit that 19, but it was too much. My “why” is freedom. I make my own schedule, offline at a certain time. And I had to do a reality check and say, “Okay, you’re getting too far out there.”

So the last couple of months, I’m still in that high five figures. And then, yeah, so this is what I do, and I’m happy to share this all with you. But literally, what I do, you guys, is I take a pen and a piece of paper and I write down every product that I use, everything from the iPhone to the water bottle. Who makes this? They go on my list and I just go hunting, and I look at their careers page.

And if they’re not hiring, I send a cold email. And if they don’t respond, I follow up. If they are hiring, I try to get, yeah, an interview. And I hunt on LinkedIn and different job boards besides like ZipRecruiter, Indeed and Fiverr. That’s just not for me.

I’m thinking, where do the people that I want to work with hang out? Facebook groups. The other copywriters maybe aren’t in. And DMs. I have multiple people that are in my DMs that I’ve been nurturing conversations with for a year that haven’t turned into anything, but on November 14th, one of them turned into a client, a retainer client.

So I guess the point is, is just figure out what you use every day. You’re their customer avatar. You’re their customer player. You know what I mean?

Alex:

I love that. First of all, I just picture you kind of hunting. You’re like, where am I going to get those clients? Where I’m going to get those clients?

And I mean, that’s incredible because you didn’t put all your eggs in one basket. You’ve gotten clients from the Posse, but you also were like, “I’m going to go out there and just, hey, what’s the worst that could happen? I’m going to send an email to the person who makes this, because guess what? I’m one of their customers.”

And I think there’s something so cool about that because you diversify your strategies so much that you’re saying no more than you’re saying yes sometimes. And then you would find job posts and you would share them in the group because you’re like, “Hey, I don’t have capacity to take on this client, but you guys, look, I found this!”

Which I thought was so, so incredible. And going back to what you said, you had one client. How long after was it after you reached out that they then came back? Five weeks?

Jenny:

Well, I was nurturing a conversation with somebody online through DMs, becoming friends with this person for a year. And they just finally said, “Okay, I’m ready to work with you.” And I said, “Great. Awesome!”

Alex:

Here’s the thing, right? No conversation is a waste.

I know a lot of times people are like, “I sent a message. I didn’t hear back,” or “I sent a message and they don’t want to hire me.” It’s like, sorry, making them aware of you in whatever capacity. Again, you were just building a relationship through DMS. You were just saying, hey, building a friendship, not trying to sell them on anything.

A year later, they came back and they’re like, hey, and there’s something so simple about it. I remember posting or talking about this in the Launch Pad last year where it was like, hey, how many of you have actually just told everyone in your life what you’re doing?

*Crickets*

Because it’s scary.

And the truth of the matter is you might not be able to think of someone right off the top of your head who’s looking for a copywriter, but if you tell all of your colleagues, former bosses, friends, family members, posted on social media, letting everyone know, “Hey, this is this new thing I’m doing. I’m looking for clients. If you know anyone, send them my way…”

You’re planting little seeds everywhere.

And guess what, the second one of those people hear is that someone needs a writer, they go, “I know someone. Let me introduce you.”

Because here’s the thing, everyone wants to be the hero and create a referral. Right? I mean, that’s part of my passion is that I love it when I know a business is looking for a copywriter and I have copywriters looking for work and I can put them together through the Posse job board and be like, “Hi, I did that. I did that. I brought them together!”

But everyone loves to create relationships because it’s such a powerful way to exchange value even when you’re just the one referring. And so letting people know what you’re doing is insanely powerful.

Jenny:

Yeah. And I came up with a little acronym a while ago, a few months ago, like be a RAD humanRelatable, Authentic and Determined. You guys, I applied for that job that I told you about that I got six times. Had I quit on number two, number three, number four, number five, who knows what could have happened?

And so just be yourself when you’re applying for jobs. People want to see your personality, right you talk. Even when you’re sending your professional email, reaching out to… I don’t know. I reached out to Lululemon, got denied three times, I think. And their email was like, “This is so great, but we’re not hiring for a copywriter.” 

Alex:

That’s amazing. Yeah. You’re like, Lululemon. That’s hilarious.

And not being afraid of rejection because here’s the thing. Right? If you think of… Let’s do some math. The average conversion rate of a sales page on let’s say a $100 product is three to 5% at the high end. Right? Now, that’s probably with leads and traffic who know who you are and what you’re doing.

You’re doing a cold email to a business that has no idea who you are. They might not even be looking for a copywriter, meaning they’re not even in the market. At least when people go to the sales page, you can kind of bet that they’re curious enough or at least in the market to possibly buy it.

And there’s no trust or rapport built, and what you’re offering is way more than a hundred dollars. It’s a high ticket service. So you got to apply that just general common sense to that sort of process. It’s a numbers game, but there are ways that you can be more strategic.

Like you said, I don’t like hanging out on Fiverr and those boards. I go to the companies who I already have an in because I’m a customer with them and they’re not going to ignore a customer. Right? Hopefully not. And companies that are already saying, “Hey, we’re hiring,” even if it’s not for a copywriter.

Jenny:

Yeah. And it’s teaching me how to get better at receiving feedback because of course, when we submit a project, we want it to be perfect because we’re perfectionists, but the truth is we’re not and we learn from the feedback. So I get denied all day long, you guys.

I even have a couple of rejection letters up in case you wanted to see them, but just know that that’s part of the process and it’s going to make you better at what you do, because at the end of the day, this is business, and I think you talked about this, Alex, right? About how we’re not selling ourselves. We’re selling our offer, what we have to give.

And so separating that too makes it a little bit easier to receive the rejection. And then receiving rejection more and more makes it easier. 

Alex:

I mean rejection, oftentimes, it’s just nothing. Most of the time, it’s a polite “No, thanks.” You know what I mean? It’s not like people are like, “You, horrible person, I can’t believe you’re trying to sell me something.”

Okay. I feel like I have so many questions I want to ask you, but first of all, I love what you said that you were hitting those 17, 19, 20,000 dollars a month. And then you were like, “Whoa, whoa, whoa. Okay, I can do this. But I’m realizing that I’m compromising some of my other values for this so I’m going to back up just a little bit.” which I think is smart if you are in the type of payment structure where it really is trading time for money.

And I think the end goal for any copywriter is to get to that point where yes, you’re on a retainer, but it doesn’t always necessarily mean working more. And that all depends obviously on the clients.

Alex:

And I know I’ve had clients that pay me on retainer and there are some months where it’s really, really quiet because I think again, there’s this misconception where… And it happens a lot.

We have this conversation in my high level groups, is we have been ingrained and trained to believe that in order to make money, we have to put in a certain amount of time. We have to work our asses off, and that obviously is true to some extent.

We’re not saying any of this is easy.

Look, you worked your butt off to get to where you are, Jenny, but a lot of times clients want to hire writers on retainers so that they have them on standby. And that means some months being quieter than others, but I mean, I know for me as a business owner, I love hiring copywriters on retainer because I know that they’re there when I need help.

And then there are some months where things are slower and I’m not stressing out that I’m not getting the value from them because other months, like planning for this launch, for example, was a ton of work. And so it ebbs and flows and finding those clients that really compliment your work style and schedule.

Jenny:

And actually to that point, one of my no’s that I applied for a job and was told no, two months later, they reached out to me and brought me on for a different project. And that no became one of my retainer clients at the time.

So no is just like a not right now. And if you keep that running list, I literally have an Excel Spreadsheet, you guys, that I just have all of the places that I want to work and that I’ve applied, and I don’t close it out until it feels right.

Alex:

And so I have some questions because this is something too that I think I try to really, really remind myself of. But how have you celebrated? Because holy shit, look at how far you have come!

Jenny:

It’s so hard. This, this is my celebration. I was leaving my house this morning to come to my new office that I manifested and my boyfriend was like, “Jenny, you never thought you were going to be a success story because you’re so humble, but let this call be your celebration.”

And I’m terrible at celebrating. I just go on to what’s next, what’s next. So how I celebrate is by hanging out with the posse, you guys.

Alex:

Girl, you have to do something so extravagant. Here’s your challenge. You have to go do something so extravagant!

Jenny:

I’m writing it down. Just kidding.

Alex:

Whether it’s going and dressing up and sitting in a lobby of a hotel and drinking ridiculously expensive champagne, or book yourself a spa day—because here’s the thing—I’m just like you. I am so freaking bad at celebrating, which is part of why I encourage you guys to celebrate and share your wins.

And I know it feels icky at first. “I don’t want to brag. No, I don’t want to be the bright light. I don’t want to take up space. I don’t want to be the tall poppy.”

I struggled with that for so freaking long. I was behind the scenes in my business for eight years before I worked up the courage to start my YouTube channel.

And then I’m like, why did I wait so long to put myself out there? And honestly, celebrating is so important. And if you’re one of those people who’s terrible at celebrating, you should be celebrating yourself now for just getting this far in the challenge.

Look at you, you’re here. You showed the fuck up, and I’m so proud of you for that.

And make celebration part of your process because I’m telling you, I am terrible at it. I am absolutely terrible at it. And Jenny, I know you are too. That’s why I called you out on it.

And I think we all need to remember how far we’ve come and how the universe, if we’re getting woo-woo, likes recognition and likes to be celebrated.

So if you’re manifesting these incredible experiences, if you’re hustling and you’re building your business, be like, I see you, I’m celebrating you. Right? Because then the universe knows, “Oh great. We’re going to send that person more of it.” Right?

And so I’m a big believer in that. And so that’s your challenge, Jenny, and to everybody on here, I’ll have you know.

***

Damn. Isn’t her story AMAZING?!?! Seriously gives me full body chills every.damn.time. 

If YOU want to ignite your freelance copywriting business, like Jenny did, using the exact same system that Jenny did… 

Then you can learn more about my flagship 8-week copywriting coaching program.

Till next time, I’m Alex.

Ciao for now!

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2 Comments. Leave new

  • Hi Alex,
    I’m inspired by your YT videos and i wanna be a rockstar copywriter too. right now i’m trying to learn from all your instructional videos.

    Thank You so much
    Gelo

    Reply

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